Chamber Music



In the 17th and 18th century, next to stage performances (operas, concerts), CHAMBER MUSIC enjoyed great popularity. Composers such as Bach, Haydn, Beethoven composed pieces to be played by Chamber Music ensembles. Chamber Music fitted into the environment of a salon.
In the era of enlightenment, the ability to esteem good music, to hudge the quality of performances, to play one or more instruments, was regarded an essential element of the education. Frederick the Great himself, at his palace in Sanssouci, as part of a chamber music ensemble, played the German flute - normally without an audience, that is.
A major source of revenue for composers and musicians alike, on those days, were the private lessons they gave to the sons and daughters of the nobility and of those who wanted to imitate the lifestyle of the nobility. For the emerging Bourgeoisie, chamber music was more affordable and easier accessible than opera performances.







EXTERNAL
FILES
Chapters Early Baroque Music, Late Baroque Music, Early 18th Century, Early Classic Style, Late 18th Century, from Music History Resources; telegram style, based on Grout/Palisca
Deutsche Musikgeschichte (History of Music in Germany), from CCn'C Records, in German
DOCUMENTS
REFERENCE



This page is part of World History at KMLA
First posted on September 15th 2003, last revised on November 14th 2004

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