History of American Samoa
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Samoa
First posted on November 23rd 2004, last revised on November 24th 2004






Timeline : American Samoa

American Samoa is the smaller part of Samoa, with a land area of 194.8 square km; by comparison (Western) Samoa 2831 square km. In 1899 the U.S. chose the territory because it wanted to secure the port of Pago Pago on Tutuila and left the larger, more populated, but less accessible part to Germany. For many decades, American Samoa was a remote corner of the U.S. Empire, largely left alone. In World War II it became a base and training site for U.S. forces. The local economy, hitherto largely self-sufficient, became dependent on the military base, and later on Tourism. American Samoans began to emigrate to the continental United States and to Hawaii in search for employment; the population of American Samoa (1996) is given as 59.566, with another 65,000 living in the continental U.S. and 20,000 on Hawaii.
Dependency on the United States has proven economically beneficiary to the American Samoans; so the demand for independence never gained popularity.


1722
1768
1830
1834
1838
1841
1847
1848-1873
1851
1857

1861
1872
1875
1876
1877
1879
1884
1887
1889
1889
1894
1899
1899

1900
1904
1925
1929

1940
1951

1960
1967
1978
1979
Islands sighted by Dutch navigator Jakob Roggeveen
Islands visited by French navigator Louis Antoine de Bougainville
Arrival of the first Protestant missionaris, from the London Missionary Society
Missionaris established Samoan as language of writing
Samoan treaty with the U.S.
U.S. navy punitive expedition landed on Samoa
Opening of a British consulate
Civil war - Wars for supremacy
Opening of a U.S. consulate
J.C. Godeffroy and Son (of Hamburg) opened depot in Apia, which resulted in Samoa
becoming the most popular trading post in the Pacific at that time
Opening of a Hamburg consulate
The U.S. established a naval station at Pago Pago, Tutuila
Samoan constitution passed
The British deported A.B. Steinberger, a U.S. citizen who hd seized power on Samoa
Postage stamps privately issued
Municipality of Apia founded - by the British
German troops landed to restore law and order
Samoan-Hawaiian treaty signed
U.S. troops landed to protect U.S. citizens in Samoan civil war
Treaty of Berlin; U.S., Britain and Germany recognized Samoan independence
Author Robert Louis Stephenson died on Samoa
U.S. forces landed to interfere in Samoan civil war
Samoa partitioned; Germany received larger west, U.S. smaller east, Britain Niue
and two Solomon islands hitherto German
Deed of Cesson - local chiefs ceded Tutuila, Aunu'u
A convention of chiefs ceded Manu'a island group to the U.S.
Britain ceded swains island, hitherto contested by Britain and the U.S.
U.S. Congress accepted the 1904 cession of the eastern Samoan islands by a
convention of local chiefs
American Samoa became training area for U.S. troops
Administration of American Samoa transferred from Department of the Navy to
Department of the Interior
Constitution for American Samoa adopted
Constitution for American Samoa revised
Governor elected for the first time
American Samoa began to attract tourists




EXTERNAL
FILES
A Brief History, from Samoan Sensation
History of Samoa, from Wikipedia, from Lonely Planet
American Samoa, from Samoanet
History of American Samoa, from Lonely Planet